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  1. As noted in the article, this issue is peculiar to or particularly acute in the Midwest. In California, where admittedly regular is high, the spread is often just 20-25&cent up to premium

  2. well the price war in Tiffin Ohio is over..everyone back over $2.00 except Kroger

    the ‘zone’ pricing still rages on though.. 2.15 in Mansfield Ohio..2.45 in Ashland ohio..12 miles away

    most other rt 20 corridor prices 2.15-2.25
    with oil taking a hammering today cant see spot moving much higher ..though with a lot of areas close to the spike line..and you know what around the corner 2.50 this time next week looks on the cards…

  3. I left Cincy last night on the train (I work for the railroad) and when passing over the Galbraith Road bridge just before Glendale, I always look over at the Greedway station on the east side of the tracks. It’s STILL showing $2.67. I guess when the spike hits this Thursday it will go to $2.99.

    It’s $2.09 in my neck of the woods

  4. No worries about a spike. GasBuddy was mentioned in the press as saying prices have dropped since June and Indiana is now below national average:)

    Indiana is 2.26 average, but not where I live in Hamilton County…

  5. On a local radio station this morning, the guy and the gal were talking, tongue in cheek, about how the price of gas is now low enough that nobody will really complain when it goes up to $2.59 this Thursday. Their words not mine, but I’m not arguing with them.

  6. Went to put a couple bucks in the car on Friday, because we were going on vacation and be using the car for a week and a half. Noticed that the Plus price was $2.22, a mere nickel over the regular price. Figured, what the hey, filled it up with the plus stuff. At a nickel more, why not? BTW, the premium price was $2.72, so I’m not sure what their pricing model was.

    Noticed a slew of stations in the Fort Wayne metropolitan area gave slid down to the magical $1.99. Cheaper than it is where I am, and I though gas was always cheaper in the south.

  7. This is the scenario I’ve always wanted to see leading up to a holiday. Spot is down at mid-day to $1.40. Now who knows if it will continue to drop this week, but it will be interesting to see if they still manage to squeak out a spike.

    They could either drop prices quickly in the next couple days so magically they’re ready to spike or they could do like they do in Cincinnati and have $1.20 margins for all of us, not just for guys like ChrisDG74.

    In the meantime, I think gas prices should continue downward for at least 48 more hours

  8. We’re sitting just about $1 over spot right now, $2.45 vs $1.40.
    Get to areas in SW Ohio with lower GREEDway concentrations, and it’s $2.12.

  9. still a massive ‘spread’ in NW ohio area..under $2.00 in places..2.40 10 miles up the road, so planning the commute/fill up takes a little more planning than usual

    right now cant see where the spike will come from..to get to 2.599 Thursday means some staions spiking almost 70c a gallon. some just a few pennies

    the area that seems to be digging in with the highest prices is actually not a Speedway town but a Marathon one..hang on dosnt Marathon own Speedway????? I do beleive so..Big blue holding the cards rather than big red..different color..same things…

  10. It might be close to spike time. In Fort Wayne, the first to spike is Lassus/Handy Dandy. What I am seeing is several of them are reluctant to lower their prices to meet competition. Just keel a close eye on things.

  11. topping off daily right now at ‘work’ end of commute wheres its 2.129 rather than at ‘home’ end where is 2.299- most local stations dropped 10c this morning but still way too high. Still a few sub $2.00 Shelby/Mansfield/Ontario Ohio but too far out way to travel to given a 5 gallon ‘daily top up’ right now

    spike line hovering in ohio around 2.10 and 3 days to catch the ‘holiday’ drivers..i am going for 2.499 reset tomorrow or Thursday..maybe a few pennies less as we seem to have had a few 2.45/2.55/2.75 spikes recently. Still could have been much worse..3 weeks ago we looked certain to test the $3.00 mark by 4th July weekend, until the ‘refinery issues’ got solved, and BREXIT stuck last week

  12. Around here in Carmel and north no real action, most everyone is stuck in 2.25 and a couple are even at 2.38… The Below Average Price Lady must be preparing to sing. Zone pricing is imaginary, right. Lots of 1.91 prices in the usual spots, but why not charge the rich folk of Hamilton County another 40c for the privilege of filling up…

    Zoom close enough to see what the gas heat map looks like. Nice green color around the interstates indicating low prices, while elsewhere… too bad.

  13. watch out ..gas buddy reporting prices “stable” this morning..AKA about to go up

  14. Here’s a price comparison chart of the gap between the lowest and highest priced gas across the U.S. prepared by GasBuddy. The prices represent the highest 5% and the lowest 5%.

    http://media.gasbuddy.com/content/docs/GasBuddy-Pump-Price-Spread-Report.pdf

  15. Well as if they needed it, here is the reason for our big jump this week..

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-28/enterprise-shuts-gas-plant-after-fire-gulf-shipments-curtailed

  16. Note the absence of Speedway states in the price spread report… except the Chicago one..

    Free markets at work, right.

  17. Hey Mike don’t forget about the potential strike in Norway, crude weekly inventories suddenly down and some additional Dead Sea scrolls found as other reasons for jumping.

    WTI Crude back on its ramp up again well over $49 nearing $50 and Chicago Spot is up to $1.45 at mid-day

    Fill ‘er up today, cuz we’re spiking tomorrow. Happy 4th of July from Big Red!!

  18. And just remember, absolutely nothing in this next spike will have anything to do with it being a huge travel holiday weekend… nope just a coincidence.

  19. It is rather difficult to take big oil seriously with such a series of events. I mean, come on people, it’s not like we haven’t seen it before.

    Now… this begs the question. How come diesel is far more stable price wise?

  20. Blaming Big Oil for oil prices rising is like blaming Home Depot for raising prices of lumber. Apparently the idea that oil (like other commodities) are *market* driven escapes several of you. Like things in life, people buy or sell on their own personal views, and goods move in value based on fundamentals that drive them. That in turn is the basis for how oil prices are set. Apparently that’s rocket science nowadays.

    Diesel is less “liquid” and less volatile because consumption is half of what gasoline is. The stakes are lower. There’s not special “blends” of diesel depending on season.

    And no Mike, this has nothing to do with July 4. Commodities values change almost every single day. If you needed to buy Gold to power your car, you’d be dealing with the same fluctuations. If you buy stocks for your retirement, you deal with the same. You don’t grasp how it works for oil? Come on.

    Put all your tin foil hats away that repel thinking and use your noggin.

    So tiring to see that you repel that logical thinking and instead want to whine and point fingers…

  21. I built a house in 1993 a month before a named storm hit the south, causing real lumber shortages nationwide. We had locked in prices and had the lumber delivered and were not impacted, my builder said a month or two later the cost of lumber would be up by 30%.

    This ain’t anything like it. For starters, there’s no shortages, just the “fear” of shortages and a few carefully placed tidbits of the information.

    Diesel… well, yea, but the same refining and distribution systems produce it, unless gasoline is produced by a highly complex refining process and distributed via exacting methods all the while diesel is refined by an 1800’s still and barrelled into stations…

    And there is an entire market construct dedicated to prevention of wild pricing fluctuations in the Commodities markets, it’s the futures markets. But of course those futures, options, and other machinations only serve to do the exact opposite of what they were once intended.

    It’s not tin foil conspiracy, Patrick. It’s reality. At least in the Speedway states.

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